Aussie women dominate in the West Indies

This article was first written for and published by The Roar

It’s been a good start to a marathon summer for the Australian women’s cricket team, who will now leave the West Indies after clean-sweeping the three-game ODI series to begin preparations for their home tour against Sri Lanka.

The Aussie women were dominant in all three fixtures and there were some pretty significant milestones reached and records broken.

What you need to know about the Aussie women’s tour of the West Indies

This article was first written for and published by The Roar

The women’s Ashes may have only concluded last month, but on Friday morning at 4am AEST, the Australian women’s cricket team begin their tour of the West Indies.

This tour is the start of the busiest summer our women have ever encountered and includes a home tour against Sri Lanka, the WBBL, WNCL, the ICC T20 World Cup and a tour to South Africa, which concludes in April 2020.

New Zealand’s investment promise the latest step forward for women’s cricket

This article was first written and published for The Roar

Throughout the duration of the Women’s Ashes in July this year, plenty of conversations were happening on a global scale about the professionalisation of women’s cricket.

The Australian women dominated the series, winning 12-4 (with England’s only points coming as a result of a drawn Test match and victory in the final T20).

Ashes shellacking shows England must invest more in women’s cricket

This article was first written for and published by The Roar.

It has been just over a week since the final game in the 2019 Women’s Ashes, where Australia celebrated a dominant tournament, taking out the series 12-4.

This was the equal most dominant series win in the multi-format history of the Ashes, with England beating Australia by the same margin in 2013.

This dominance reflects what we have seen from this team on the world stage over the last two years. In that period, the Australian women have lost just six games out of 40 across all formats. Since 2018, the team has only lost three games, and all of them were in T20, the most fickle format of all.

Australia retain the Ashes despite a tinge of sadness

This article was first written for and published by The Roar

Early on Monday morning the sole Test match in the Women’s Ashes was declared a draw in Taunton.

With that declaration, the Australian women’s cricket team can officially celebrate retaining the Ashes with the team holding an 8-2 lead in the series heading into the final format, the three T20Is which will commence on Friday.

New faces and experienced hands as Aussie Ashes defence goes red ball

This article was first written for and published by The Roar

Tonight the Australian Women’s cricket team re-commence their fight to retain the Ashes when the first (and only) Test begins in Taunton.

Australia head into this Test in a strong position holding a 6-0 lead in the series. For Australia to retain the Ashes, only a draw is required in the Test whereas for England to reclaim the Ashes they need to win the Test – as well as the three T20Is which are still to come.

Who will open for the Aussie women in the Ashes?

This article was first written and published for the Roar.

The Australian women’s cricket team have touched down in the United Kingdom ahead of their 2019 Ashes defence, which begins on 2 July.

The Ashes was last contested in 2017, Australia retaining the urn after the series ended in a draw, with both teams finishing on eight points.

Ellyse Perry scoring 213* at North Sydney Oval in the stand-alone Test was the stand-out moment of the series for many.

James Faulkner’s gaffe demonstrated a lack of awareness

This article was first written and published for The Roar

Words matter, and this week, Australian cricketer James Faulkner was reminded of just how visible his words are.

On Monday evening, Faulkner shared a post on Instagram where he was photographed with his mum and what has subsequently been revealed to be his roommate.

The caption when it was first shared featured a reference to his “boyfriend” and – for good measure – Faulkner added some love heart emojis in there too.

What’s in a name?

This article was first written and published for The Roar. 

A couple of weeks ago I met someone at a function. From the outset it was clear that we both had a mutual interest in sport, particularly cricket.

He asked me who my favourite Australian cricketer was.